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Full text of "Tennessee River Baptist Association Minutes 1893"

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Microphotographed 
by 

SAMFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

Birmingham, Alabama 

Tennessee River Missionary 
Baptist Association 



v. 1. 1890 



v.2. 1891 



v.3. 1892 




v.4. 1893 



v. 5. 1895 



v. 6. 1897 



v. 7. 1898 



v. 8: 1899 




v.9: 1900 



" ■» ■ \ - 



AUfiAKA BAPTIST HISTORICAL SOGOT 




l llll ll l i i H i i' ii 




MINUTES 



OF THE 



ThiftJ-Wh Unntial ffeftion 



OF THE 



Tennessee Rwer Baptist Association, 



HELD WITH THE 



<SHUF<GH AT GUI^IjEY, 

Madison County, Ala., 
September 29, 30, October 1 and 2, 

1893. 



OFFICERS: 

Moderator, Crawford Howell, Francisco, Ala. 
Clerk, L, C. Couwon, Scottsboro, Ala. 



MOJJTGQMBBT, ALA. : 
ALAB, 










W*%jg$w&* 



7 



SUNDAY SCHOOL ■ PERIODICALS. 




^bese B el P s » witb tbeir 

Literary and gobolarly Rbilit|f 

Rnd Denominational Soundness, 

gbould find a place in every gobool. 




is^rasixjnnEis 



-(OST THK)- 



Tei^essee Rive? ^sseeiatien 



O (OK) o 



lS/lissionsuirpy Bstrp-tists. 



o (HELD WITH)- 



Gnrley Baptist Cbnrcb, 



-(AT)- 



[URLEY, $(AD1SQI JAUNTY, |lABAMA. 



■#=±BS: 



■ Or^ - 



September 29, 30, October 1 and 3, 1893. 



-^ses 



s EEcS - 



OFFICEBS. 



CRAWFORD HOWELL, Moderator, Francisco, Ala. 
LAW8ON C. COULSON, Clerk, Scotteboro, Ala. 
MILTON ROACH, Treasurer, Fackler, Ala. 



SCOTTBORO, ALA, 

Pboqrkssivb aox Punt. 

1898. 



Note— On the suggestion of J. J. Beeson no Executive Board was appointed, but that 
■the Associational Mission Work be left to the churches, who will, by their extra ordained 
ministers supply the destitution near each Church and report work next year. 

Clbbjc. 






1 ' 



Order of Business. 



Friday, September 28, 1894. 

1, Annual Sermon, 1j o'clock, a. m. 

2, Call to order. 

3, Read Letters and note names of Delegates. 

4, Election of Officers, Moderator, Clerk and Treasurer. 

5, Petition ery Letters. 

6, Invite Correspondents and Visitors to seats. 

7, Appointment of Special Committees. 

I, Religious Services. 

II, Obituaries. 

III, Periodicals. 

IV, Finance. 

V, Appointment of Standing Committees. 

o 

Saturday, September 29, 1894. 

8, Select place of next meeting. 

9, Select Brother to preach Annual Sermon, and Alternate. 

10, Call for Reports of Standing Committees in their order. 

I, Synopsis of Associatinal Letters — L. C. COulson. 

II, Associational Missions, by the Ministers who have done 

work under their pledge made last year at Gurley — 
Condenced by L. C. Coulson. 

III, State Missions — Preston Brown, John Bouldin and "W. A. 

Coffey. 

IV, Home Missions — W. W. Howard, W. L. Stephens and J. F. 

McCarroll. 

V, Foreign Missions— Virgil Bouldin, W. A. Pigg and J. H. 

Roach. 

VI, Ministerial Education — J. J. Beeson, "W. W. Roach and J. 

L. Jones. 

VII, Ministerial Relief— Sam Butler, J. A. Dicus and W. J. 

Roberta, 

VIII, Temperance— J. F. Gable, E. T. Tate and C. T. Starkey. 

o— 

Sunday, September 30, 1894. 

IX, Sunday Shool work — J. M. Mclver M. Isbell and J. B. 

Campbell. 

X, Woman's work — Maggie Sublett, Maggie Beard and Mattie 

Ivey. 

XI, Denominational Education — Virgil Bouldin, G. "W*. Wells. 

and Peter Brown. 



Monday, October 1, 1894. 

XII, Queries — A. B. Womack, W. J. Wigington and J. J. Berry. 

XIII, Bible and Colportage work— G. T. Womack, J. A. Dictts 
, and T. A. Gattis. 

XV, Reports of Special Committees — 

I, Beligious Services. 

II, Obituaries. 

III, Perodicals. 

IV, Finance. 

V, Miscellaneous. 

VI, Resolutions. 

VII, Adjournment. 

INTRODUCTORY. 



A he introductory services of the Association was introduced 
jjf by singing No. 85, Gospel Hymns : 
Jesus, lover of my soul, 

Let me to thy bosom fly, 
While the nearer waters roll, 

While the tempest still is high; 
Hide me, Oh my Savior hide, 

Till the storm of life is past ; 
Safe into the haven guide, 
Oh, receive my soul at last. 
Prayer led by J. J. Beeson. C. Howell then road Secfnd Cor- 
inthians, iv, 1. "For we know that if our earthly house of this taber- 
nacle were dissolved, *e have a building of God, an house not made 
with hands, eternal in the Heavens, etc. At the conclusion of 
the reading the congregation was lead in prayer by the reader. 
Singing by the choir, No. 45, Gospel Hymns. 
" Jesus keep me near the cross, 

There a precious fountian ; 
Free to all a healing stream, 
Flows from Calvry's mountain. 

Chorus : In the cross, in the cross, 

Be my glory ever ; 
Till my raptured soul shall find 
Rest beyond the river. 
11 o'clock, a. m. : Crawford Howell, in the absence of W. L. 
Crawford, preached the introductory sermon, he being the alternate. 
He selected as his text Mark xvi, 15 and 16 verses. 15, "And he 
said unto them : Go ye, into all the world and preach the gospel to 
every creature." "He that believeth and is baptized shall be saved, 
but he that believeth not shall be damned." 

1st. Go teach is the commandment given to us as individuals ; 
that is, teach by our lives as well as by our words, what God de- 
signed in our salvation. 

2d. We are, as churches, to teach the word of God, and to so im- 
press it upon others that they may be saved. We are assembled 






as the delegates from the churches that we may as an Association,, 
devise ways and means to give the gospel to others. 

3rd. To initiate those that are taught into the body of Christ 
his churches, that they may hold the doctrines of Christ in the unity 
of faith, which is the power of God unto every one that believes. He - 
urged upon the delegates and ministers present to greater effort 
more earnest work and greater constancy in following out the great 
commission. Closed with prayer by P. Brown. 

At 2 o'clock, p. m., Friday, September 29, 1893, the 36th annual- 
meeting of the Association was called to order by L. C. Coulson 
clerk, in the absence of W. L. Crawford, the moderator, by singin^ 
No. 103. After singing the clerk read the second chapter of first 
Timothy. First: "I exhort therefore, that first of all, supplications 
prayers, intercessions and giving of thanks be made for all men' 
etc. Prayer by C. Howell. 

On motion of C. Howell, snpportod by J. J. Beeson, P. Brown 
was selected moderator, pro tem., whereupon J. L. Thompson and 
W. J. Roberts were appointed to read the church letters, when the 
following churches responded by letter and delegate, or by letter • 
1. Antioch, by letter; no delegate. 

Beech Crove, T. A. Gaddis and K. H. Jacks. 

Bethel, J. P. Bryant, L. T. Webb and S. K. Corn. 

Centenniel, T. W. Carns,W. M. Chandler and P. A. Carlisle 

Cave Spring^ Leroy Rash. 

Charity, S. M. Honta, and Leonard Cagle. 

Cumberland Mountain, no letter; C. J: Brewer, delegate 

Center Point, W. O. Thorp, J. A. Dicus, J. P. McLendon* and 

Joseph Hill. 

Freedom, C. L. J. Sisk, and J. T. Hinshaw. 

10. Friendship, Milton Roach, A. P. Womack, Benton Womack 
and Pleas Campbell. 

11. Gurley, W. J. Roberts, Jonathan Beeson, J. N. Roberts S J 
Jacobs and M. O. Grim meet. 

12. Harmony, J. J. St. Clair, W. B. Campbell and C. M. Hiirein- 
bothain. * 6 

13. Hales Cove, J. J. Berrv. 

14. Holly Spring*, Levi Harrison and J. J. Coffey. 

15. Harris Chapel, no letter or delegate. 

16. Jones Cove, no letter or delegate. 

17. Larkinsville, E. P. Cowart. 

18. Mountain Grove, no letter or delegate. 

19. ML Nebo, R. C. Horton, B. B. Tony, W. H. Williamson and 
J. J. Cunningha.m 

Mount Zion, W. J. Wigington. 

Mount Pisgah, J. T. Richards and Joe Smalley. 

Mount Ararat, James Frazier and J. M. Glover. 

McCoy 8 Grove, no letter or delegate. 

New Hope, P. H. Helton ; no letter. 

Scottsboro, Virgil Bouldin and W. W. Howard. 

Ship of Zion, E. T. Tate. 



2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 

9. 



I 



20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



27. Trenton, L. E. Smith, J. A. Flanagan and W. E. Horton. 




28. Union, S. B. Sisk and G. W. Ezell. 

29. Ebenezer, (Ga.) no letter or delegate. 

30. Tunnel Hill, (Ga.) no letter or delegate. 

MINISTERIAL DELEGATES PRESENT. 

P Brcwn, J. J. Beeson, L. C. Coulson, C. Howell, R. Howell, W~ 
R. Ivey. M. Isbell, J. L. Jones, G. W. Morris, W. A. Pigg, L. W- 
Woodali, T.N.Coleman, Henry Knight and G. W. Wells. Total 
number of delegates, 65 ; five less than las year. 

Election of officers for the ensuing year, moderator, clerk and 
treasurer. - 

On motion of J. J. Beeson, supported by C Howell, the election 
was proceeded with by ballot. The Moderator, pro tern, appointed 
J. L. Thompson and Noah Maples tellers to receive, count and de- 
declare the result of the ballot. The tellers, after counting the bal- 
lots, reported that Crawford Howell was elected Moderator, L. C. 
Coulson, re-elected Clerk ; and Milton Roach, re-elected Treasurer 
for the ensuing year, 1893-4. 

5th. Petitionaey letters called for, when Charles T. Trown and 
J. C. Holt, came forward and presented a letter fron* rridgeport 
church, asking to become a member of the association, and that her ■ 
delegates be rocognized as a pledge of her sincerity to abide by the 
faith and practice of the association. On motion of J. J. Beeson, sup- 
ported by W. R. Ivey, the churches letters received and delegates in 
vited to seats — and thereupon the moderator, while, a verse was sung,. 
extended the right hand of fellowship to the delegates from said 
church, bidding them welcome. 

6th. On motion of W. R. Ivey, supported by J. J. St. Clair, the 
moderator invited corresponding messengers and visiting brethren 
of the same faith and order to seats with the association when J. L. 
Thompson, from Duck River Association, Noah Maples, from Mount 
Carmal Association, J, P. Hampton, moderator of the Liberty Asso- 
ciation, W. A. McGaha, President of Howard College, E. W. Pettua, 
of Liberty Association and others whose names and work was not 
furnished the clerk, was recognized by the moderator and invited to 
seats. 

7th. Appointment of special committees. 

I, Religious Servijes, Pastor J. L. Thompson and deacon of 

Gurley Church. 

II, Obituaries. — F. P. Cowart, W. W. Howard and W. T. Roberts. 

III, Periodicals—.!. J. St. Clair, W. O. Thorp and Mike Hill. 

IV, Finance— B. B. Toney, Mike Hill and T. A. Gattis. 
Y, Appointment of Standing Committees. 

I, Synopsis of Church -Letter — L. C. Coulson. 

II, Associational Mission — W. R. Ivey, A. B. Womack, G. A. 

Beard (The duty of this Committee, is to arrange and 

report on the field work by the voluntary mission 

work as suggested by J. J. Beeson). 
ITI, State Mission. Preston Brown, John Bouldin and W. A. 

Coffey. 
IV, Home Mission. W. W. Howard, W. L. Stephens and J. F. 

McCarroll. 



"W» l'^ Mi > 



6 

V, Foreign Missions. Virgil Bouldin, W. A. Pigg and J. H. 

Boach. 

VI, Ministerial Education. J. J. Beeson, W. W. Boach and 

J. L. Jones. 

VII, Ministerial Belief. Sam Butler, J. A. Dicus and W. T. 
Roberts. 

VIII, Temperance. J. P. Gable, C. T. Starkey and E. T. Tate. 

IX, Sunday School Work. J. M. Mclver, M. Isbell and J. B. 

Cam bell. 

X, Worn ens Work. Maggie Sublet t, Maggie Beard and Mattie 

Ivey. 

XI, Denominational Education and College Work. W. R. Ivey, 

G. W. Wells and Peter Brown. 

XII, Queries. A. B. Womack, W. J. Wigington and J. J. Berry. 

XIII, Bible and Colpprtage Work. G. T. Womack, J. A. Dicus 

and T. A. Gattis. 

At 4 o'clock p. m., on motion of P. Brown,, supported by J. J. 
Beeson, Association adjourned to 9 o'clock tomorrow morning. Ben- 
ediction by Mike Hill. 

Services Friday 7 o'clock p. m. conducted by J. J. Beeson. 

Opening song. No. 303, Gospel Hymn. 

On Jordans stormy banks I stand, 

And cast a wishful eye 
To Canons fair and happy land' 

Where my possessions lie. 
Chorus— We will rest in the fair and happy land, 

Jnst across on the evergreen snore 
Sing the song of Moses and the lamb by and by. 

And dwell with Jesus evermore. 

Bead Scripture, Philipians, iii chapter. Song by Choir No. 10, 
Gospel Hymns. 

"Whosoever heareth," Shout Shout the sound! 

Mend the blessed tidings all the world around, 
Spread the Joyful news wherever man is found 

Whosoever will, may come— 

CHOBI78— 

Prayer led by J. J. Beeson. Song No. 240, Gospel Hymns. 

Why do you wait, dear brother, 

O why do you tarry so long? 
Your savior is waiting to give you 

A place in His sanctified throng— 

CHOBC8— 

Text Phil, iii 13—14. 

13th. "Brethren, I count myself to have apprehended, but this 
one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reach- 
ing forth to those things which are before." 

14th. "I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling 
of God in Christ Jesus." 

THEME CHRISTIAN WARFARE. 

Paul in writing to the Phillipians had more in view than mere- 
ly to be saved. He understood that the called out of God had a great 
work to do, that the Christians life was like that of a good soldier. 
Pressing forward, eagerly striving to be the best soldier. That as a 
soldier of the Lord Jesus Christ he must fight, strive, labor to earn 
the crown. 

2nd. In this warfare we are to be tried, tempted, yet to be puri- 
fied as by fire. That Christ* death meant more than that he died 



7 - 
for Paul's sake, or our sakes, that we might merely reach heaven, but 
being Christ, we are to strive to win souls for him, that we may 
wear crowns with stars of the first magnitude in thjjm. 

3rd. While we are to work, strive and labor for the salvation of 
others we are to be blessed in this, while at work. More we are to 
rejoice bringing in the sheaves, so that the grand climax of the Chris- 
tians life is to win a crown, and hear the Savior sayf'come ye blessed 

of my Father." 

September, 30, 1893. 

Saturday morning 9 o'clock . Association met according to 
adjournment. Present : moderator, clerk and delegates. Boll called, 
names of delegates corrected. 

8th. The Association preceded to select the place of next meet- 
ing by ballot. On the count of the ballot by the tellers it was found 
that Freedom Church, on upper Paint Rock, had been selected for 
the next place of meeting. 

9th. The next order of business was the selection of a preacher 
to preach the introductory sermon for next year. A. W. McGaha 
and J. P.Hampton were appointed as tellers to receive and count 
the vote. The election resulted as follows : W. R. Ivey to preach 
introductory and J J. Beeson alternate. 

10. The moderator then proceeded to call for reports from the 
standing committees in their order. 

First. Report on Associational letters read by chairman, and on 
motion of P. Brown, supported by J. J. Beeson, addopted. 

REPORT. 

As a committee of one to report on church letters, beg to submit 
for your consideration the following on condition of the churches as 
shown by the tetters within the bounds of the Association. 

Antioch. — This church has during the year enjoyed marked re- 
freshings from the Lord and greatly revived. This church fails to 
report any money raised for general purposes. C. B. Roach is pastor. 
The membership is 33. During the year five have been received by 
baptism. The delegates failed to reach the Association. 

2. Beech Grove. — This church has not sustained itself, and has 
lost ground. It has failed to hold any meeting of days. It has a 
membership of 94, its contributions for all purposes as shown by the 
letter $5.25. C. Howell pastor. 

3. Bethel. — This church has made some advance. They baptized 
5 during the year. It has a membership of 65 now, and raised 49.15 
for church purposes. J. J. Beeson is its pastor. 

4. Bridgeport. — This is anew church, and has 70 members. It 
keeps up a live prayer meeting and Sunday School, and is the best 
church at work in the Association except possibly Gurley church. 
It raised for all purposes $74.36 ; more than one dollar per capia. 
This church is located in the City of Bridgeport, and should have 
the aid, sympathy and prayers of the people of God. 

5. CENTENiAi^.-r-This church shows considerable improvement. 
•It has babtized 5, and has a membership of 58, and has rised $28.25 
for various purposes. Pastor, R. Howell. 

6. Cave Spring. — This church has now a membership of 50, but 
has done nothing in the way of raising money for any purpose. Pas- 
tor, R. Howell. 



8 

7. Chyirty.— This church has overhauled its membership and 
now has 64 members in good standing. It supports a good Sunday 
School and a weekly prayer meeting, well attended for a country 
church. It has raised $22.60 for general purposes. Four of the 
Sunday School students memorized and repeated during the year 215 
scripture verses. Pastor, William Jacks. 

Cumberland Mountain.— 'J. J. Brown represented this church, 
but no letter was prepared for the Association. It is the first time 
that this church has failed on a letter in years. It has had no pastor 
to preach for it, hence it is in a bad shape. 

9. Center Point. — This church enjoyed a good meeting of days, 
and baptized seven converts. It has a membership of 62 ; has a regu- 
lar prayer meeting and Sundav School. For Sunday schools it has 
contributed about $15.50. Joseph Hill is Superintendent of the 
school. Pastor, P. Brown. * 

10. Freedom.— This church has a membership of 174, but reports 
nothing for any purpose, yet its membership are well to do. Why 
they make no report of any monev for church purposes it is hard to 
tell. Pastor, C. Howell. 

11. Friendship.— This church has a membership of 97, and has 
a Sunday School, raised for all purposes $98.00, a little over one dol- 
lar per capia. Pastor, J. J. Beeson. 

12. Gurley. — This is the banner church of the Association. Its 
membership is 63; has a good prayer meeting and Sunday School 
every week; W. J. Roberts, Superintendent ; also a young peoples 
union. This church has raised $707.95 for the different objects. Pas- 
tor, J. L. Thompson. 

13. Harmony. — This church has 49 members, and has raised 
$8S0") for all purposes, it has a good Sundav School and is a model 
country church ; pastor, W. L. Crawford. 

14. Hale's Cove.— This church has 61 members, raised for 
church purposes $8.75, and keeps up a good Sunday School and 
prayer meeting; pastor, W. A. Pigg. 

15. Harris' Chapel.— This is a little church near Carpenter, 
but has failed to send letter or delegate. 

16. Holly Springs. — This church has 20 members, and has done 
very little in the way of money, $2.68 ; pastor W. A. Pigg. 

17. Jone's Cove. — This church is unrepresented, but ought to 
have been. 

18. Larkinsville.— This church has 16 members, aids in a Sun- 
day School, and contributed for missions $9.00; pastor P. Brown. 

19. Mountain Grove.— This is a small church, and not repre- 
sented. 

20. Mt. Nebo.— This church has 64 members raised $97.00 for 
church interest. It says pray for us. Pastor, Henery Knight. 

21. Mt. Zion.— This church has 78 members, but has given noth- 
thing for any purpose during the year. Pastor, Elijah Crawford. 

22. Pisgah.— This church has 121 members, it has a good Sun- 
• day School and prayer meeting ; raised for church purposes $100.84. 

It is located on Sand Mountain. Pastor, J. J. Beeson. 

23. Mt. Ararat. — This church only has 30 membership, and 












9 
has given $5.00 for all purposes; pastor called for next vear, W. A. 

24. McCoy's Gbove. — Not represented by delegate or letter. 

25. New Hope — No letter but represented by Dr. P. H. Helton. 
Pastor, B. Howell. 

26. Scottsboro.— This church has 64 members. Baptized four 
from its Sunday School. Three from one class. Sunday School 
and prayer meeting every week, and preaching two Sundays in 
each month. It has raised and expended for church work more 
than $750.00. Its pastor is T. N. Coleman. 

27. Shu* of Zion. — This church has 70 members, keeps up a 
Sunday School and prayer meeting ; pastor, James McCloud. 

28. Tbenton. — This church has 28 members. Baised $17.00 for 
church purposes. Pastor, Henery Knight. 

29. Union. — This church has 23 members, raised $5.77^. It has 
made no progress ; pastor, W. A. Pigg, recently called. 

30. Ebebnezeb. — This church was not represented by letter or 
delegate. 

31. Tunnell Hill. — This church is not represented by letter or 
delegate. 

In conclusion I will say that the church clerks are to blame 
for not doing what is required of them, so that we can have the full 
statistics, financial and other necessary information to show how 
much work has been done during the year. 

Bespectfully Submitted 

L. C. Codlson. 

II, On Motion of P.Brown, supported by Virgil Bouldin, the re- 
port on associational mission and report of the Executive Board be 
consolidated, and at three o'clock, p. m., be made the hour for said 
report. Adppted. 

On motion of W. B. Ivey, supported by J. J. Beeson, it was or- 
dered that the report on state, home and foreign missions be each 
read in their order and discussed together, which motion was adopt- 
ed. Beport was then read by J. J. Beeson, Chairman, and on mo- 
tion of J. J. St. Clair, supported by P. Brown, adopted. 

BEPOBT. 

III, Your committee on state missions submit the following: 
That while our state mission board is doing all it can to supply 

the towns and important places in the county with the gospel to aid 
weak churches, and to organize and build up churches in desti- 
tute places, and at this time and for some time past, the 
said board is in pressing need of funds to pay off the mission- 
aries in its employment. And while the churches in this Associa- 
tion are composed in a considerable degree of very poor people, 
many of them day laborers and tennants, struggling hard for a mere 
substance, yet the greatest trouble is a want, or lack of interest and 
co-operation in the churches with the said, board, as well as a want 
of a deep enterest in all our mission interprises. How to remedy 
this, is s a question we know not how to answer. When we preach and 
talk on the subject of missions, it seems to do but little good. 
When we try to get our people to buy our literture and take and read. 



■ - 



I 



10 
papers, some are too poor, some say and think they are too poor, and 
some will neither buy the books, nor take and read the papers. So 
under the fcircum stances, the best thing we can reccomend is that 
all collections for missions be taken by all our churches every 
month at the close of the preachers sermon, that he in a few words, 
instruct his congregation in regard to their duty in this respect. 
Then let him insist that the church make >a dividend of the funds 
thus collected between the Foreign, Home, State and Associational 
Boards according to the necessities of said boards. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. J. Beeson, 
Chairman. 
IV. The report on home mission was then read, and on motion 
of J. J. Beeson, adopted. 

BEPOBT. 

Report of committee on Home Missions. The Home Mission 
Field is the teritory covered by the Southern Baptist Convention, in 
other words, the Southern States and (he Island of Cuba. It ex- 
tends from Maryland to Texas, and Missouri to Florida. Within its 
limits, are some 20,000,000 of people, of whom about 7,000,000 are 
negroes," beside the enormous numbers of our own native southern 
peoplB an the frontiers of the west, and the poorer thinly settled 
mountain districts of Carolina, Georgia, Kentucy and Virginia who 
need help. We have among us. an increasing host of Germans and 
other foreigners who are peopling the Cities, and are now penetra- 
ting to the rurua 1 districts to commingle with us. Missouri has 
more than 800,000 German population. It is said that more than 
50,000 Germans land every year at Baltimore. These all come speak- 
ing strange tongues, imbued with false and strange religious no- 
tions, and social habits. Besides these, large numbers of Mexicans 
drift annually across the American border and people the plains of 
Texas. Added in these are the Indians, the especial Divinely or- 
dered wards of the American Government, and American Christi- 
anity, and among whom the work of evangelization has received a 
divine sanction rarely equalled in missionary work. The teritory 
occupied by them is being more and more filled with white people, 
who, thrown away from the centers of religious influence, are in ex- 
treme need of missionary work to organize and develope as well as 
to plant the standard of Christainanity where the chime oi Sabbath 
bells was never heard, and the song of praise never ascended to 
Heaven. There are also imperative calls for help in the Catholic re- 
gions of Lousania, Florida and Cuba. Under divine direction the 
Home Mission Board has been using the means at hand upon the 
various fields, as a prayerful consideration of their several needs 
seemed to direct. The work has been attended with gratifying re- 
sults. In the report on» Home Mi ssions at the last. Alabama State 
Convention, it is said of the Home Mission Board, "it is support- 
ing 365 missionaries who constituled last year 179 churches, or- 
ganized 342 Sunday Schools, built 80 houses of wershipand added 
11,247 rnerflbers to the 1,324 stations." Brethren, after a somewhat 
careful study, and investigation of the work of Home Mission, a 3 



. .. .i i j » 



MhMMnBiraa 



11 - 

emphasized in the report published in the minutes of the Southern 
Baptist Convention which met in Nashville in May last, we are of 
opinion that no branch of mission work is now making stronger 
appeals to loyal Baptists than this southland of ours. Baptist have 
had the fariest opportunity on earth. For one hundred years the 
condition of the people have been more favorable for the reception 
of the Gospel, in its simplicity. More than three-fourths of the Bap- 
tist of the Union are within its boundry. Upon us God has laid the 
responsibility for the evangelization of the world as upon no other 
people under Heaven. JlHome Missions are important because every 
spring of foreign missions must find its source on the home field, 
because God in his Providence is bringing the world to us, so that 
we must meet them with the open Bible to elevate or be ourselves 
submerged by the inflowing floods of religious or moral corruption^ 
We know not how better to conclude this report than by quoting 
the words of Dr. J. B. Gambrell at the last Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, when speaking of the importance of home mission: 
-"^Southern Baptist, taken en masse, are like our national resources, 
vast but undeveloped. Numbers do not make strength. We may be 
many and yet hot much. In the World of wealth and of forces raw 
material is of great value, but only that it may be developed into 
higher form. Our great numbers form the base of the grandest 
missionary army the world has yet seen if we are wise and tactful 
to utelize what God has given us. Let us face the truth. Southern 
Baptist greatly need breadth. Very many of us are satisfied if it is 
measurably well with our own church and neighborhood. The 
fields do not lie as a solemn charge on our hearts. Local feelings and 
sectional feelings are stronger than the spirit of universal evangeli- 
sation. When we lift our eyes to behold the fields we need a very 
much wider range of vision than many of our good people have, 
and we need to study and practice co-operation in the broad spirit 
of the Gospel. Very greatly do these millions of Baptist need to feel 
the thrill of that masterful spirit which sent the disciples every- 
where preaching the gospel. Home Missions rightly directed look 
to all these things. The inflowing multitudes who are coming to us, 
who will build new towns and cities and enlarge existing com- 
munities must be received and made obedient to the faith by a ro- 
bust, dominating home mission work. It must be large, commanding 
and gracious to hold to it the men of growing wealth, and to save us 
from a material civilization. Let there be no walls built around 
us to exclude Chinese or whoever else will come; but for their 
frown let us give them the bread of Heaven, and instead of a spirit of 
exclusion, let us face outward and send our men with our prayers^ 
and our money wherever Providence opens the way. Your com-^ 
mitte profoundly feel the dignity and grgn/lnrp pt the foreign 
work, but cannot sink out of view the evident fftcjjtii at . ai l nf -4he 
OHBflings of the f oreign work are in the h anie field, strength aT~ 
home wTsely directed, means - strength abroad. It seems to your 
committee that the need of home mission as a means of unifying 
our forces of developing and pulling up the weaker states into 
Jarger movements of the denomination, can scare eley be estimated. 
We believe that never in our history was the urgency for large 
plan^ and literal support for the home board greater than now. 









■•' 



12 

Tremendous things must be done within a few years if the future 
south is to be cast into New Testament moulds. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

VlRGIL BOULDIN. 

Chairman. 
V. The report on Foriegn Mission was then read by the clerk, 
all the members of the committee failing to appear, and on mo- 
tion of W. R. Ivey, supported by J. J. Beeson, report adopted. 

REPORT. 

Your committee ask tr submit the following report. . 

We have been materially aided in getting up the report on the 
subject of Foreign Missions by consulting the report on this subject, 
in the proceedings of the Southern Baptist Convention. We cannot 
enter into so lengthy a discussion of the subject as was permissible 
in that body. Yet we are- glad to note the fact that during the year 
much has been accomplished, but much is yet to be done by the.ser- 
yents of God before we can stack arms and go into winter quarters. 
Owing to the wide extent of the held we can only give a brief sum- 
mary of the work done' on the various fields. The work in. China 
was begun in 1845; in Africa, 1850; in Itialy, in 1870; in Brazil I, in 
1882; in Mexico, in 1880; and in • Japan, in 1889; and the mem- 
bership of all is 2,923, that they collected from these churches 
■during the time indicated, $5,368.42. The total collection 
of missionary funds for the year 1892-3 was $155,937.23. The 
disbursment proximated the 'amount of collection. Of this 
amount Alabama contributed $5,688.64; Arkansas, $358.72; Dis- 
trict of Columbia, $660.00; Florida, $298.25 ; Georgia, $4,904.25; 
Kentucky, $7,201.74 ; Lousiana, $451.35 ; Maryland $13,417.82 ; Missis- 
. sippi, $975.88 ; Missouri, $ 2,040.26 ; North Carol in, $1,751 86 ; South 
•Carolina, $6,000.05; Tennessee, $2,050.43; Texas $2,608.98; and Vir- 
ginnia, $618.88 ; making a total of $49,784.81, less expense $46,900.92. 
'This is the centennial fund reported, but further time was given and 
the report is therefore incomplete. This however added to other 
collections made at home and on foreign fields, aggregated the sum 
of $155,937.28 collected for all purposes. This sum was and is to be 
distributed to the work of foreign fields. The misson work has 
greatly increased not only in papal fields but at home as well as 
appears from the reports on home work. We cannot afford to close 
this report without saying something for the encouragement of our 
noble women workers. The work of the womans missionary union 
resulted in raising for foreign missions alone $36,042.78. This is an 
increase over last year of $11,002.51. The membership in foreign 
-fields was 330. The membership of the Baptist Churches in foreign 
lands is more than -6,000. When we remember, the Southern Con- 
vention was organized in 1845, at Augusta Georgia. This report 
■only gives what has been done by the Foreign Missionary Board of 
the Southern Baptist Convention. In closing this report we desire 
to say that many of our people are too careless about knowing of 
the work done and being done. Your committee, recommends that 
we redouble our energies and see if we eannot make each succeed- 
ing year better than the past. Respectfully submitted, 

L. C. Coulson, for committee. 






13 

The three reports on State, Home and Foreign missions was dis- 
cussed by A. W. McGaha, W. R. Ivey, Vergil Bouldin, J. J. Beeson, 
P. Brown and others. The discussion was lively and interesting, as 
all talks on missions are. A great many facts were brought out 
along the line of mission work. 

VI, The report on ministerial education was then called for 
and read by the clerk, who prepared the report, all of the standing 
committee failing to prepare a report, whirh on motion of P. Brown, 
supported by W. R. Ivey, was adopted. The report was discussed by 
Hampton," M. Isbell, W. R. Ivey, J. L. Thompson, L. W. Sloan, P. 
Brown and M. Hill. 

REPORT. 

Report on ministerial education. submitted by the clerk as fol- 
lows. - 

The great command is: "Go teach all nations, baptising the 
taught," converts. Further, "Study to show thy self approved unto 
God, a work that man needeth not to be ashamed, rightlv dividing the 
word^ of truth." • Still further, "Search the ucriptnre, for in them ye 
think ye have eternal life." These Scriptures indicate a necessity 
for preperation that our teaching may be efficient. There is no 
book so little understood as is the Bible, if we accept the conclusion 
of the various scholars of this day and generation. One school of 
teachers teach one way, another school another, and yet another a 
different theology. This all comes of our inperfect knowledge of 
God's word. It is desired to impress upon this body the importance 
of thorough preperation for teaching in holy things as well as in 
secular. Men cannot teach unless they be fiirst taught. It is now 
well settled, that Paul, one of the most scholarly men of his day, 
when converted' and called to teach, spent three whole years in pre- 
paring himself for the work to which he was called of God, not- 
withstanding he was an educated man. This new doctrine, salvation 
by grace, and which embraced Jew and Gentile, he did not under- 
stand, therefore, notwithstanding his great learning, he strived to 
know the new plan, that he might teach it to others. There is an 
actual inhibition upon the church, that no man should be ordained 
to the work of the ministry until it is shown that he is "apt to teach." 
It is insisted further, that when any church ordains a man, sends 
him out to teach, who is not prepared to teach, it makes a very grave 
mistake. The greatest mystery is, how the churches come to get 
into the practice of ordaining men to teach who are strangers to the 
simplest form of words, and their meaning, and yet we are told that 
we must send these out as teachers, to teach men how the great plan 
• of salvation will help them. It is true we are in a very different 
condition now to what our fathers were. We are new called out to 
meet all shades of views and opinions touching the teaching of 
God's Word. The teacher of today is forced to mee t t bible infidelity 
and all 'shades of skepticism, therefore, it is of the highest impor- 
tance that every teacher should go out armed with full gospel truth, 
that he may wage a war offensive and defensive as a good soldier of 
Jesus Christ. 

Respectfully submitted 
L. C. Coulson, 
for committee. 



— - 




Vn, The report on ministerial *elief was called for and read by- 
A. B. Womack, and on .-notion by fcl Isbell, supported J. J. St. Clair r 
adopted. 

REPOT \ 

Your committee on ministerial r* .ief make the following report : 
Since we are taught that the got* *1 is the power of <*od unto sal- 
vation to every one that believeth and since we are taught that 
men and women are enabled to sec their saved condition through 
the instrumentality of the gospel p reached to them attended by the 
Holy Ghost, and since we are also taught that those who. preacn 
the gospel shall live off the go*pel, we, your committee iMirtthrt 
it is the bounden duty of the churches to be diligent m •applying 
the needs of those they send out as missionaries, and we should And,, 
clothe and educate their children ac i families. 

Respectfully submitted 
A.B. Womack, 
i Chairman. 

(Note. This report misses the purpose and intention of tho 
association. Its purpose is to try.*! i find out who, if any of ourold 
and infirm preachers are in need o: assistance : how they have been 
helped.)— Clerk. 



Vin. The report on temper 
read by the chairman, and on mou 
J. J. St Clair, adopted. The repc 
J. P. Hampton, L. W. Sloan, P. Bio* 
On this report a motion was made + 
discussion to ten minutes. (Why the 
specially, I as chairman, hope ne. 
heard of and very unkind to say th? 



ace was then called for and 
n of W. R. Ivey, supported by 
t was discussed by W. R. Ivey„ 
n, Mike Hill, and W. J. Roberts. 
M. Roach, and carried, to limit 
rattles was called on this report, 
r to know. It was unusual, un- 
Ieast.) 



BEPO T. 

Your committee on temperance submit the following report 
We have had the subject matt • of this report under considera- 
tion for nearly a year, and during ie time we have watched care- 
fully the trend of the circumstances surrounding the whole qnestion 
of the liquor traffic. While the evi * of the sale and use of intoxicants 
has increased in the aggregate, y o in the rural districts it has de- 
creased. The greatest increase hi been in the larger cities, es- 
pecially is this true of the beer drii iers. This one legalized evil is 
doing more to corrupt American * Cities, trades and morals than all 
others combined. It is fostering mo e crime and criminals today than 
all other elements together. It is tie fostering pandora of crime and 
the mother of nearly all other bli ering, withering infamies. But 
we do not wish to be confined in our report to the curse of the 
liquor power, which stands above all other sources of crime. We 
will call attention to the fact that 11 intemperate indigencies are 
inhibited by Divine Revelation as veil as by natural observations. 
If we eat too much, sleep too much, think too much, talk too much,, 
drink too much or read too much we are guilty of violating the 
great injunction of our Creator, to be temperate in all things. We 
wish to say further that we violate this prohibition oftener in our 




15 

apetites than in any other way, excei.t one, at any rate, we have 
known very few who % have been intemperate in giving to the 
cause of Chrfst, and we note this as the exception. The man who 
drinks liquor is now scoffed at while the man who swears is barely 
noticed ; the man who gets money by devious ways is condemned, 
while the man who gets office by questionable methods is honored 
And respected; the man who votes directly or indirectly for the 
man who legislates in the interest of the open saloon is respected, 
while our agent in doing the act of selling is condemned. Conclud- 
ing we wish to suggest that we should be very careful to abstain 
from things hurtful, and careful not to abuse those things that are 
lawful and not hurtful except in the abuse of them. Therefore we 
say : Touch not, taste not, not to look upon wine when it giveth its 
color in the cap, for at last it biteth like a serpent and stingeth like 
an adder. 

Respectfully submitted 

L. C. Coulbon, 
Chairman. 
On motion of P. Brown, supported by J. J. St. Clair, 'the associa- 
tion, at 4:30 o'clock, p.m. adjourned to Sunday morning, 9 o'clock, 
Oct the 1st 1893. 



The following services were had Saturday night, at the Bap- 
tist church. A. W. McGaha conducted the service, after thevolun- 
tary by the choir, he read Romans, vii, beginning with the 7 veree, to 
-the end of the chapter. 

Song No. 407, Gospel Hymns. 

""M aster the tempest is raging ! 

The billows are tossing high I 
The sky is overshadowed with blackness. 

No shelter or help is nigh ; 
Carest thou not that we perish ? 

How canst thou lie asleep, 
When each moment so madly isthreatning 
A grave in the angry deep, 
Chokus : The winds and waves shall obey my will, 
Peaee be still ! etc. 
Prayer by P. Brown. 
Song No. — , Gospel Hymns. 

"Behold what love, what endless love, 

The Father hath bestowed 
On sinners lost, .that we should be, 
Now callod the sons of God." 
Chorus : Behold what manner of love, etc. 
Text Komans vii-17. "Now then it is no more I that do it, but 
•am that dwell eth in me." 

"Thine duty of the ministry to preach the whole truth 
that men may know they are sinners." Mr._ McGaha read. 

The subject of the text is not very invifing to the thinker. The 
preaching of to day is much like some pills sugar coated. Many of 
-our preachers love to fight people, and what they did two thousand 



16 

years ago, but are backward in attacking live people in their wicked- 
new mo w. They fail often to tell how sick a man is, who is in 
open rebellion against God. Look into the courts, read over the 
criminal dockets and get a lesson out of it along the harder side of 
humanity. Our Pastors and teachers are so careful in the sugar 
coating process, that in dosing out the gospel they allow the sin sick 
patient to die and go down to hell without their hardly knowing 
how sinful they are. Many of our preachers tremble when in the 
presence of a skeptic* or an infidel. Sin is a crime against God, and 
its penalty is death to mans spiritual good. God's docket is a crimi- 
nal one, and we must ';e tried by it. No escape, and we fusnish the 
evidence by which ,e are judged. Only one way out, through 
Christ. Must be borr again. Snake eggs never hatch out chickens. 
While sin is in the heart, the desire to sin, it alwavs produces a sin- 
ful life. The child o 1 eys when young. The begining of disobedi- 
ence in a child is whe the parents dodge responsibility. The down- 
fall of the preachers is when he fails in dutv. Some men seem to 
think Heaven is a pla e that they can reach by simply sitting down 
and waiting for it to come to them. God has decided how we are 
to be saved, and if we /ail to accept that plan we are lost. We are 
now through Christ,;' d not of ourselves. When saved we will 
go forward and make .ume effort to bring others to this knowledge. 
In religion as in everything else we must work hard and constantly, 
and use a great deal of firtilizing to be a full grown Christian. By 
letting the words grow in our Christian homes we ought not to be 
surprised when our boys go to the bad. Our influence is either for 
betterment or for demoralization. Let us guard well the portals 
of our life work. 

W. R. Ivev preached Saturday night at the Presbyterian church, 
but I cannot give a synopsis of the service, because it has not been 
furnished me. 



Sunday morning, Oct 1st, 9 o'clock a. m. association met accord- 
ing to adjournment. 

IX, The report on Sunday School work called for and read by 
W. T. Roberts, chairman, and on motion of P. Brown, supported by 
W. O. Thorp, adopted. The report was discussed by G. T. Womack, 
Henry Knight, Nathen Smith, C. Howell and others. 

Report. 

Your committes on Sunday School work beg to submit the fol- 
lowing report. We find that only—of the 30 churches that compose 
the Tennessee River Association have Sundav Schools, and they 
with one exception fail to give a complete report of their schools. It 
is to be regretted that so little emphasis is placed on this important 
line of church work, when it should be remembered that the Sunday 
School is the church at work, winning souls to Christ, a nursery from 
which its membership is received from time to time. Our children 
of this generation will be the men and women of the church in the 
next. The condition of the future church depends in a great meas- 
ure on the present training. If we expect a missionary church, 
"we must have a missionary Sunday School. Does not this impor- 



17 

tance demand more than a mere report followed by a set speech or 
two. There is no field that promises greater, immediate or prospec- 
tive results, and no department of associational work cries louder 
for attention and cultivation. 

If we fail to do our duty in this matter, others with more zeal 
will step in and take our young people from u*. We therefore re- 
commend that the pastors who have no Sunday School in their 
churches call their people together, discuss the best methods and 
organize a Sunday School and select their most live, enthusiastic 
workers as officers and teachers and make their statistical report to 
our association so that we may keep a record of what has been done 
in this line of work during the year. We further recommend to 
the favorable consideration of schools now in opperation and all 
new ones which may be organized, the literature of our Sunday 
School board of the Southern Baptist Convention, located at Nash- 
ville, Tennessee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. T. Roberts. 
Chairman. 



X. Report on Womans Work read, and on motion of M. Roach,, 
supported W. R. Ivey, adopted without discussion. 

bepokt. 

Your committee on Womans Work beg to submit the following 
report. 

We were appointed as a committee on this work at your last as- 
sociation. We have not done much for the cause. We organized one 
Sunbeam Society, and by this means raised and sent to the board $8.- 
65. We had very little encouragement in this work, but done what 
we could. Hope our sisters will be able to do more next year. 

Respectfully etc. 
Ellin R. Watt, 

Chairman, 



XI. Report on denominational Education on motion of P. 
Brown, supported by W. R. Ivey, wa*> taken up on Saturday, read and 
discussed by W. R, Ivey, A. W. McGaha, Virgil Bou.din, J. J. Bee- 
son, P. Brown and others, and on Sunday morning called up in the 
regular order of business, and on motion of J. J. Beeson, supported 
by P. Brown, adopted. 

BEPOKT. 

Report on Denominational Education. The cause of education 
has never received the earnest attention and hearty support of Bap- 
tist. Whenever Baptist churches have united in strong and active- 
associations for the spread of the gospel and the advancement of the 
Redeemers Kingdom, a prominent place has been given lo education 
and denominational schools. Denominational education in its 
broadest sense includes pastoral and evangelical work, also the 
work of books, papers, tracts, etc., as used for informing the people 
-of the gospel, and its teaching, and setting fourth clearly and force- 



■ ■■Il l 





18 
fully, the glorious principles of Baptists. Our denominational pa- 
pers, our Sunday School literature, the indoctrinating of our people 
from the pulpit and elsewhere, especially in pastorial work, con- 
stitute an important part of denominational education. It is of the 
utmost importance that our principles be made known to the people 
and that Baptist be thoroughly indoctrinated. No church can be strong, 
active and useful or happy, without being indoctrinated. The 
Master urged Peter: "Feed my lambs". "Feed my sheep." We 
are not in favor of fostering a low order of sectorianism, but we 
urge the importance of teaching our distinctive truths and peculiar 
principles in all their beauty and glory in the churches and Sunday 
•chools, and in our denominational papers and Sundav School lit- 
erature, books, etc. Let Baptists be Baptists. As to schools and col- 
leges the field is a wide one. * Our state schools, Howard College, at 
Birmingham, and the Jedson Institute, at Marian, Alabama, and our 
Southern Baptist Theogical Seminary, at Louisville, Kv., should have 
a prominent place in our hearts and be supported bv us 
to the extent of our ability. These are great enterprises; Besides 
these time honored institutions, so blessed by God and so loved by 
Baptistsgenerally, denominational schools in many parts of Ala- 
bama are fostered by the generous efforts of the brethren. For all 
of these institutions we would say a kind word and would bid them 
good speed. But just now, within our own bounds the young, but 
rapidly developing Scottsboro College, is looming every da v into 
prominence and more and more importance under the auspices of 
Baptists, and is doing a glorious work. It is to this most excellent 
institution of learning as the special object of the fostering care of the 
Baptists of the Tennessee River Association, we point with pride 
and say to the brethren : "You, indeed, have a great enterprise on 
hand, and it does not yet appear to what extent all the Baptists of 
Alabama will rally in the great cause of co-education in the delight- 
ful climate of Jackson County." We make the following special 
statement with great pleasure. ' r 

1. The Baptists of Scottsboro and the county generally seem 
to take a deep interest in the enterprise. 

2. In addition to the. hearty co-opperation already received 
from this association, and in response to a communication from this 
association to the North Liberty Association, touching the matter, 
six trustees have been added by the North Liberty Association to 
our Advisery Board, and that association is in hearty sympathy with 
us and will co-opperate. • " " 

3. The people generally are giving a hearty support and seem 
greatly to appreciate our efforts to maintain a school of high order 
such as we now have in full and successful oppration under an 
able and efficient faculty, in all departments. 

4. The school is in a prosperous condition. In June five pupils 
graduated. The reorganization of the work at present is complete. 
Teachers and pupils have entered enthusiastically into their work 
In the senior class eight pupils have matriculated. All departments 
are well attended and in full operation ; well supplied with "the best 
teaching tallent. Utilizing the commodeous and well arranged 
building, improved, furniture fixtures, etc. We should note the fact 



'•*• 



19 
thria change has been made in the faculty. Rev. T. N. Coleman, 
welcomed as the successor of Prof. J. M. Bledsoe, and is successfully 
and satisfaetorialy performing the duties of the office. These facta 
warrant ua in recommending that the Tennessee River Baptist As- 
sociation and Baptists generally heartily support our beloved college 
t?8eott*l*«ro, by patroSage, by donations, by kindly mention and by 
ill other proper means on all occasions when they may have the 
♦Wrtunityofsadeing. It is worthy of the fostering care of the 
MMeiation and the confidence and patronage of the people. 
mmcmuoji m Respectfully submitted 

W. R-Ivkt, 
Chairman. 

Sunday School at the Baptist Church conducted by T. .N^Cole- 
man, of Scottsbore College. 11 o'clock p. m.. Dr. Coleman >*trodttc- 
ed the service by some well chosen remarks on the power of the 
Word of God, which brought us ministers, delegates, Sunday School 
workers and people together this morning. He emphasised the 
wo^derfulpowcr God in His Word has in bringing us into a sound 
wlaSy?wm G»d in Christ: He then read the fin* chapter 
of the gospel by John. Song by choir. Gospel Hymns No„ 110. 
Joy to the world, the Lord has come ; 

Let earth receive her king, 
Let every heart prepare him room ; 
And Heaven and nature sing. 

Prayer led by Miller Isbell. 

Song No., Ill Gospel Hymns. 

"Alas and did my Savior bleed ; 

And did my Soverign die, 
Would he devote that sacred head ; 
For such a worm as I." 

Text iiTemothy,ii: 9. "Wherein I suffer trouble, •»£»•▼» 
doer, even unto the hand, but the word of God is not bound. 
The discussion was confined mainly .to those words. "But the 
word of God is not bound." Paul was in trouble at this time. He 
was being prosecuted and persecuted as an evil doer, and was at 
this time even under bonds or imprisonment ; being under guard or 
Roman soldiers. Yet while he underwent these sufferings he 
by the grace of God felt and realized in his heart, he could speak 
out above all these things, and praise God for onecentral though^ 
"Though I may be bound and kept m prison, the Word of Godwas 
free, not bound." They could bind Paul, but the word of Pauls 
God was free. He could preach it. This- unbound word of God 
irloried in is the same we preach today, and it has the same saving 
Sower now that it had then. Paul was a great missionary, going to 
the regions beyond. He had preached in Asia, Greece, Rome and 
Itialy, he preached the same Gospel everywhere, and as he went he 
organized churches, and then when discensions arose he went back 
and straightened out the crooked places. Paul was the right kind 
of a preacher. He went right on teaching this new doctrine, salva- 
tion by Grace, leaving the results with God. 



mmmmmmmm 



20 

Service at C. P. Church conducted by G. W Wells of R™« a 
boro College. Sunday Oct. 1, 1893 ', ° 8cotts - 

^hri^ 6 w Bph ^ ians , ii : 12 - "That at that time ve were- without 

€hnst, being aliens from the commonwealth of Israel and etTam™ 

h7wo^ ^ving no hope, inTw'^ouf^f in 

lodTe^and Sfoilf^ \^^ r r;i?L t u h t e Go^°^ 

S£ ^ 

depths of lm love and mercy. As Kins He laid dawn wi. ifl° 

al gSS«£S ,8 He U ™ad e „ a8 a ," t0e ^."J-grSciousastht^rt o( 
™„. I ^i' , He made ample provission for every sinner in thn 

fhT/oy 1 :? Sea^'&t ™ 08e J h ° «*** Bis^rac^ loV* 
<)uter Urld ft n!.pnf 23? ct Hun a ? d you ^° int0 the darkness of the 
friends °o to Jw P iif nd y ° U ™ ceive the «nendingness in joy. Our 
th«m S? ' hey Cannot come back to us, but we cfai eO to ' 

that reaches success Thf ?' w f, ♦ • 8te . adv forward movement 

they are TWs ifonlv ^ h.-i/ '? 1 iJ ,trive t0 know who a ^d what 
«*««»«.« inisie only a brief of the sermon, but realv do«« nf ,t 
-do the sermon justice at all. Prof. Wells is one 5 o^r best preach- . 

-o 



ser T Sfa^ h rBa P ,fst 7 6h reh ,OC Ri t t W ' W °" 8 "»*»•« *• 
xxvi • <*fi «£t ^P" 81 *-; n urch. His text was taken from Mathew 

^ffff Ls^ftwasBKs. is tte r -a 



1893. 



The Association met Monday morning, 9 o'clock, Oct, 



2, 




21 • 

VII. Report on queries read, and on motion of J. J. St. Clair 
supported by G. T. Womack, adopted. 

REPORT. 

Your committee beg to submit that as there were no queries 
sent up by the churches, we have nothing to submit for the con- 
sideration of the Association. A. B. Womack, 

Chairman. 

XIII. Report on Bible'and Colportage work, submit ine fol- 
lowing, which on motion of JR. Howell, supported by W. T. Roberts, 
adopted. 

REPORT. 

Your committee on Bible and Colportage work submit the 
following. 

The Association having abandoned the missionary plan of 
work as heretofore followed)" we see no way for the distribution 
of Hfcreature religious or otherwise than through ihe Sunday Schools. 
We therefore recommend that 'each Sunday School worker order 
literature from the Bible and Colportage Board located at Opelika, 
Ala., where all classes of our religious literature can be had, and 
all of our denominational books and ! periodicals can be had. 
Write J. B. Collier at that place for what' you want. Respectfully 
submitted. A. B. Womack,' 

, Chairman. 

XIV. Report of [missionary work done in the hands ot tne As- 
sociation under the Mike Hill resolution, and on mdtibn of P. 
Brown, supported by J. J. St.* Clair, adopted. ' 

REPORT. 

Missionery work in the Association. 

We your committee submit the following report of the work 
done by the ordained ministers of this body as voluntary mission 
work, and not under the direction of the Board. 

1. W. A. Pigg travelled 320 miles,* preached 104 sermons, 
twenty-five exhortations, baptzed nine, and received $16.95. , 

2. L. C. Coulson travelled 180 miles, preached fifteen sermons, 
delivered ten Sunday School and three temperance lecturers, and 
paid $12 50 in traveling expenses. 

3. R. Howell 'traveled 95 miles, preached sixteen sermons and 
held four prayermeetings extra of his pastor work. 

4. P. Brown travelled 300 miles, preached twenty-six sermons, 
and received $15.00. 

5. L. W- Woodall travelled fifty-five miles, preached six ser- 
mons. Has been in bad health most of the time. 

6. Henery Knight travelled 250 miles, preached thirteen ser- 
mons and received $18.20 other than what he did under the direc- 
tion of the Board, which is shown by the Boards report. 

Only six of the whole number of ordained ministers reported. 
If all had reported to us we would have had a very interesting re- 
port ro submit. If the brethren just understood themselves and 
would come up like men and report what they have done during 
the year, we would get the best part of the work reported. We 



I. 







22 
suggest farther that we are at loss to know why M. Hill did not 
make a report, as he was present and is the author of the resolu- 
tion under which these reports are called for. Why do we ask for 
the adoption of a resolution when we never intend to observe it 
when passed. Respectfully submitted. 

Miller Isbell, 

Chairman. 
XV. Report of the Execution Board and committe on Associa- 
tional Missions condenced under P. Brown's resolution, which was 
read by chairman of committee, and on motion of W. R. Ivey, sup- 
ported by M. Hill, adopted. 

REPORT. 

Tennessee River Association, Sept. 1893. 

We your executive committee appointed at the last meeting fo 
this body, beg leave to submit the following report. Pursuant to 
the call made at the time the board was appointed, a meeting 
was held in Scottsboro in January 1893, at which time P. Brown 
was elected chairman and empowered to receive and disburse the 
funds collected for associational purposes. .Bro. H. Knight 
of Larkin Fork, AUu, was elected missionary to'work at such times 
and places as the chairman should indicate at f 2. 00 per day, when 
in actual service. This arrangement continued until the next 
meeting of the committee at Fackler, May the 20th. At that time 
Bro. Knight reported thirty-eight days work and received payment 
of the amount due him to wit, $76.00. Seeing that the collections 
and subscriptions would not be sufficient to meet the dues of the 
missionary, under the arrangement, Bro. Knight generally agreed to 
continue at the. work at his own selection as to the places he should 
fill, and take for his services such sum as he should raise on the 
field together with whatever additional sum should be raised by 
the committee on he original subscription. Bro. Knight reports 
13 sermons prea hed and $18.20 raised on the field, besides 
$24.18 for pas' >rial service rendered in the meantime. 
The board has >n hand' to be paid him, the fnrther sum 
of $15.75. making i total for his work $134.13. Brother Knight 
has done a f aithf t ! and efficinet work, which has been blessed of 
-God. After a faithful effort, the committee is of the opinion that 
for the next year i will be unwise to employ a missionary as such, 
and respectfully re commend that the several churches in the associa- 
tion be charged w ; th the oversight of the distribution in their re- 
spective neighborhoods, believing that there is ample means in 
every church to sr pply the destitution and that the strong churches 
can eaisly send a supply to places remote from any organization,. 
and that there is no reason why the people should not be reached by 
the gospel, if the churches will employ the talent and means at their 
command. We would exhort the churches to perform this plain 
duty that they owe to the neighbors, and to report the result of 
such work to the next association. The fo egoing is submitted as a 
report on associational missions, and on the work of the board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

• P. Brown, 

Chairman. 







28 

XVI. Report of special committees : 

1. Report on religious services,' on motion of W. O. Thorp, 
supported by M. Hill, adopted. 

REPORT. 

Your committee on religious services submit the following re- 
port : 

J. J. Beeson preaches Friday night at the Baptist Church. A. 
W. McGaha preached at the Baptist Church Saturday night, at 7 
o'clock ; and W. R. Ivey, at the Methodist Church, at 7, p. m. 
T. N. Coleman preached at the Baptist Church Sunday morning at 
11 o'clock, and W. G. Wells preached at the C. P. Church, at 7, p. 
m. M. Hill preached at the Flatts, out from the city. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. N. Coleman, 
Chairman. 

OBITUARIES. 

2. Report on obituaries submitted, and on motion of W. O. 
Thorp, supported by M. Isbcll, adopted. 

report. 
We, your committe, beg to- submit, that on reading the. letters 
coming from the churches, they have lost by death since our meet- 
ing last year, whose names and churches are as follows. Beech 
Grove, Rebecca Davis ; Centennial, John J. Brigendine ; Chairty, 
Lindsey Kegle; Freedom, Martha J. Sisk and, Sarah Houston; 
Friendship, Elizabeth Isbell ; Hale's Cove, David Clem. We offer 
our sympathy to the bereaved. 

Respectfully snbmitted. 

W. W. Howard, 

Chairman. . 

3. Report on periodicals read, and cm motion of P. Brown, sup- 
ported by R, Howell, adopted. 

report. 
Your committee on periodicals beg leave to report as follows: 
1st. We recommed the reading of the Bible, as it is the only 
rule of our faith and practice, and believe, it should form the basis 
-of our own christain motive. 

2nd. We would recommend the "Alabama Baptist," the organ 
of the Alabama Baptist Convention. Although there are other 
good sound Baptist papers, yet we believe the Baptist should be 
preferred to others. 

3rd. We recommend the Sunday School series of the Southern 
Baptist Convention as being thoroughly orthordox, and well adapt- 
ed to our Sundav Schools. 

4th. We reeommend the Bible Colportage Board as the proper 
place to procure our books, papers and periodicals. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. J. St. Clair, 

Chairmad, 



24 

4. Report of Finance committee read, and on motion of Jona- 
than Beeson, supported by W. O. Thorp, adopted. 

REPORT. 

We, your committee on finance, for printing minutes submit the 
following report : 

We find, on a call of the churches, the following churches and 
amounts reported : Antioch, $1.50; Beech Grove, 55 cts. ; Bethel, 
$1.00 ; ( Centennial, 65cts. ; Care Springs, 1.00 ; Charity, 60cts ; Cum- 
berland Mountain, ; Center Point, $1.25; Freedom, 2.00; 

Harmony, 2.00; Hale's Cove, 95cts; Harris' Chapel, ; Holly 

Springs, 36cts; Jones' Cove, ; Larkinsville, 50cts; Mountain 

Grove, ; Mt. Nebo, $2.00 ; Mt. Zion, 40cts ; Mt. Pisgah, $1.50 ; 

Mt. Ararat, 60c ts; McCoy's Grove. ; New Hope, 50cts ; Scotts- 

boro, $2.50; Ship of Zion, $1.00; Trenton, $1.25; Union, 70cts; 

Ebenezer, ; Tunnel 1 Hill, ; Bridgeport, 1.00; Friendship, 

1.50 ; Gurley, 2.00. Total $27.21. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. B. Toney, 
Chairman. 

- o — 

5. Report of the treasurer of the Association, submitted, and 
on motion of J. J. St. Clair, supported by W, O. Thorp, adopted. 

REPORT 

To ballance on hand, 1893, $12.02. 

April 4, 1893 Friendship church $10 00 

July 20, " " " 16 32 

• Sept. 23, " " " 10 00 

" 30, " Larkinsville, 4 00 

" " " Charity 2 05 

Oct. 1, " Centennial 2 75 

" w " Beech Grove 2 45 

» * " Gurley 7 80 

" " " Pisgah 6 00 

" " " Sunday collection 18 22 

" " * Harmony. 8 75 

" " " Mt. Zion 100 83 84 

Credit .95 86 

May 17, 1893 Rev. H. Knight $12 02 

April 4, " H. A.Tupper 10 00 

July 20, " W. B. Crumption 16 32 

Oct 2, " H. Knight.. 24 35 

" " " L. W. Woodall 3 30 

" " " W. A. Pigg 3 30 

" " " L. W. Sloan 3 30 

" " " Gurlev Church 4 00 

" " " W. B. Crmnpton 19 25 95 84 

Balance 2 

Milton Roach, 
Treasurer. 



25 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

■_ XVII, On motion of P. Brown, supported by J. J. St. Clair, 
W. R. Ivey was elected as a delegate to the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, and Virgil Bouldin alternate. The convention meets with 
First Baptist Church, Dallas Texas, Friday before second Sundav in 
May, 1894. F. H. Kerfoot preaches convention sermon, and j" W 
Ford, alternate. 

On motion of P. Brown, supported by J- J. St. Clair, L. C. Coul- 
son was elected as a delegate to the Alabama Baptist Convention, and 
W.J.Roberts, alternate. The state convention meets Nov 7 1893 at 
Oreenvile, Alabama. * ■ * 

On motion of J. J. St. Clair, supported bv J. P. McLendon 
that any member of this association attending any one of our sister 
associations are authorized to act as fraternal messenger from this 
association. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

XVIII, On motion of P. Brown, supported by J. J. St. Clair, 
the following resolution* was adopted. 

Resolved, 1st. That the clerk of the, association be, and he is 
hereby directed to have the minutes printed by the Alabama 
Baptist. 

2. That he be allowed $10.00 out of the amount contributed for 
minutes as compensation for his work and expenses, etc. 

3. That he have as many miuntes printed as $17.21 will get, and 
distribute them prorata. 

On motion of J. J. St. Clair, supported by R. Howell, the follow- 
ing resolutions were adopted. 

Resolved, 1st. That the thanks of the association are hereby 
tendered our moderator and the clerk for the efficient work done by 
them during the sittings of the body. 

2. That the thanks of the delegates are due to and are hereby 
tendered the good people of Gurley, and members of this church for 
the kind hospitality we have received at their hands durin^ our 
stay with them. 

3. That the thanks of this body be tendered the Memphis & 
Charleston Railroad Company, in giving reduced rates to friends 
and delegates to the association. On motion of the clerk, supported 
by W. O. Thorp, the following resolution was adopted. 

Resolved that this association do now adjourne, to meet with 
Freedom Church, Jackson county, Ala., on Friday after the fourth 
Sunday in September "1894. The old accustomed hymn, was then 
sung. 

"How firm a foundation, ye saints of the Lord, 
Is laid for your faith in his excellent word ; 
What more can he say, than to you he has said, 
You, who unto Jesus for refuge, have fled." 
While this song was sung, the parting hand was extended, after 
which the association was led in prayer by P. Brown. Benediction 
by the moderator, and the association stood adjourned, Sine die. 




26 



Crawford Howell. 
Moderator. 



L. C. Coulbon, Clerk* , . 

Note— It is suggested that the chairman of the several standing 
eommittes will prepare their reports, and send them to the clerk at 
least one week hefore the meeting of the next association, or notify 
him that they do not intend to prepare these reports for them. 

L. C. Coulson, 
Clerk. 

Ordained ministers and their postoffices. 

Crawford Howell, Moderator, Francisco, Ala. 

L. C. Coulson, Clerk, Scottsboro, Ala. 

Brown P., Hollywood, Ala. Jones, J.L. Paint Kocfc, Ala. 

Beeson, J. J., Pisgah, Ala. Knight, H., Holly Tree, Ala. 

Collins, D. S., Narrows, Ala. Knight, J. L., Coffees Store,Ala 



Gable, J. F., Bridgeport, Ala. 
Howell, R., Stevenson, Ala. 
Higingbotham, M. Hollywood, 



McCloud, Jas., Pisgah, Ala. 

Manning, P. G., Whiteside, Tenn. 

Morris, G. W, Kirbys Creek, Ala. 
Halting^ G- XL. Larkinsville, " Pigg, W. A., Paint Rock. Ala, 
Ivey W. R., Scottsboro, Ala. Roach, C. B., Fackler, Ala. 
Isbeil, J. W., Limrock, Ala. Sloan, L. W., Gur ley, Ala. 
Isbell, M., Limrock, A1&- Starkey, C. T., Pisgah, Ala. 

' ' Woodall, L. W., Gurley, Ala. 

During the sitting of the association, or at least those present, 
pledged that they would supply the destitution in their immediate 
vicinity, and it is hoped that those who were net present will fall 
into line, and give a good report next year. clerk 






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Blank Books, 

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STATIONERY. 



Blanks, 

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hwf-x 



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26 



Crawford Howell. 
Moderator. 



L. C. Coulson, Clerk- I ^ _ , 

Note— It is suggested that the chairman of the several standing 

commutes will prepare their reports, and send them to the clerk at 

least one week before the meeting of the next association, or notify 

him that they do not intend to prepare these reports for them. 

. L. C. CyOITLSON, 

Clerk. 
Ordained ministers and their postoffices. 
Crawford Howell, Moderator, Francisco, Ala. 
L. C. Coulson, Clerk, Scottsboro, Ala 

Brown, P., Hollywood, Ala. Jones, J. L. Paint Rock, Ala. 
Beeson J.' J., Pisgah, Ala. Knight, »-, Holly Tree Ala 

Collins, D. S., Narrows, Ala. Knight, J. L., Coffey?s btore,Ala. 
Gable, J. F., Bridgeport, Ala. McCloud, Jas., Pisgah, Ala. 
Howell, R., Stevenson, Ala. Manning, P^v Whiteside, Tenn. 
Hijringbotham, M. Hollywood, Morris, G. W, Kirbys Creek, Ala, 
Hastings, G. M., Larkinsville, " Pigg, WA, Paint Rock. Ala, 



Ivey, W. R., Scottsboro, Ala. 
Isbell, J. W., Limrock, Ala. 
Isbell, M., Limrock, Ala. 



Roach, C. B., Fackler, Ala. 

Sloan, L. W., Gurley, Ala. 

Starkey, C. T., Pisgah, Ala. 

Woodall, L. W., Gurley, Ala. 
During the sitting of the association, or at least those present, 
pledged that they wonld supply the destitution in their immediate 
vicinity, and it is hoped that those who were net present will fall 
into line, and give a good report next year. 









JOB PRINTING 



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We will make it to your 
advantage to get our esti- 
mates on all kinds at 

Job Priritirul 
before sending your orders 
elsewere. 



The Progressive Age 



OCDQ OFT'-H 'ICE!. 



1*^ 


* 




* 


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I* 


* 




* 


* 




* 


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* 


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►• 






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Blank Books, 

Pamphlets, 

Books, 



in 



STATIONERY. 



Blanks, 

Receipts, 
Circulars, 



A I^E keep in stock the best quality of Stationery and 

*"* are prepared to turn ont this class of work at short 

notice and at reasonable prices. Giye us yonr orders. 



And Gneral Job Printing. 



wmiwiM 



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Repairs. Fuel, The 
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Value of Bui 

and Fumi 


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tu.e. 



MOT 



■■III H I M il 



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PAYNES EUREKA H03 CHOLERA REMEDY. 

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Scottsboro, Ala- 



Stettistioe of Tennesse 3R1- 




CHUROH 



3 



6 

7 

*8 

8 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 
30 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



Antioch 

Beech Grove 

Bethel 

Bridgeport 

Centennial 

Cave Spring, 

Charity 

Cumberland Mt. 

Center Point 

Freedom 

Friendship 

i-Jurley 

Harmony 

Hales Cove . . . 
Harris Chaple.. 
Holly Spring. . 
Jones' Cove... 
Larkinsville. . . 
Mountain Grove 

Mt. Nebo 

Mt. Zion 

Mt Pisgah.... 

Mt. Ararat 

McCoy's Grove 

Newhope; 

96j Scottsboro. . . . 

27 Ship of Zion... 

28 Trenton , 

29 Union 

SO Ebeneezer , 

31 iTunnel Hill. . . 



COUNTY. 



PASTOR. 



Jackson Co. Ala. C. B. Roach. . , . 

C.Howell, 

J.J. Beeson-.. . 

J. F. Gable 

R, How«ll. 

R. Howell 

Wm. Jacks. ... 



Madison 
Jackson 



u 

Madison 
Jackson 

u 
u 



a 
a 



P. Brown 

C. Howell 

J. J. Beeson. . . 
J. L. Thompson 
W. L. Crawford 
W.A.Pigg ... 
J. L. Langs ton . 
W. A. Pigg 

C. T.8tarkey. ... 
P. Brown 

D. 8. Collins... 
H. Knight 

E. Crawford.... 

J.J. Beeson 

W^ A. Pigg 

C. T. Starkey. ... 
R. Howell 



CLERK. 



James McLoud. 

H. Knight 

W. A. Pigg 



3. F. McCarroll.. 
E. J. D. Kennedy 

J. P. Bryant 

T.A. Oakly 

N. B. Hunt 

Isaac Mathews. . 

S. M. Hosca 

John Sanders 

W. O. Thorp.... 
J. T. Henshaw.. 
J.-B. Campbell.. 
W. T. Roberts... 

J. G. Sanders 

J. L. Jones >. . . . 
8. P.Ganston.... 
G. W. Thompson 
W. B. Wheeler. . 
E. P. Cowart.... 
W. M. Williams. 
W.H. Williamson 
W. J. Wigington 
W. T. Richards 
John Barclay... 
J. H. Caperton. . 

J. F. Terry 

Virgil Bouldin.. 

S. S. Puryear 

L. E. Smith..... 
S. B. Sisk 



CLERK'S P. G, 



I 
© 9 

s 
3 



INCREASE 






& 



Dade 



Ga.|P. G. Manning. 



J. S. Jones. 



Hollvwood, Ala 
Francisco " 
Fackler, " 

Bridgeport, " 
Bass **■ 

Coffey's Store," 
Newmarket, " 
Alto, 

Settsboro, 
Estilla Fork, 
Fackler, 
Gurley, 
Mad Creek 
Paint Rock, 
Long Island, 
Nat, * 

Pisgah, «, 

Larkinsville. * 
Graysbnrg, " 
Holly Tree, " 
Kirby's Creek. » 
Pisgah, * 

Limrock, " 
Fabius, <* 

Coffey's Store." 
Scottsboro, f 
Hollywood, » 
Trenton, » 

Garth, *• • 

Shellmound, Ten 
Whiteside, „ 



25 

108 

62 

60 
45 

58 
30 
43 
187 
85 
56 
48 
62 
14 
12 
88 
17 
52 
63 
88 
118 
37 
16 
79 
46 
72 
50 
23 
42 
33 



Total. 



5 
32 

8 
5 



10 
5 



16 
S 
6 
8 



1261 84 26 



o 

a 
c 

> 



24 




^&2P Asscx^iation, 1893. 



BY 



a 
c 



1 



1 



DECREASE BY 





a 








3 


9 






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A 


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— ' a 



MBTDAY SCHOOL. 



■O 

IS 

•- sj 
00 — 

S O 

U » 



SUPBINTENDBIWB NAME AND P.O. ADDRESS. 



S 

6 . 

i . 

26 



18 

7 



12 



12 



3 
12 



87 



32 



24 



11 



94 

65 

70 

56 

60 

68 

30 

51 

174 

97 

63 

49 

63 

14 

16 

38 

16 

52 

65 

76 

128 

30 

16 

79 

64 

74 

64 

28 

42 

33 

1788 



1 



50 

'49 

85 



45 
138 

8 

30 



25 



Peter Brown, Bridgeprt, Atal 

A J. Perry, Newmarket, Alii. 
Joseph Hill, Scotteboro, Ala. 



45 



45 
40 
85 



A. P. Womack. Fackler. Ala 
W.T.Roberts, Gurlev, Ala 
John G. Sanders, Mnd Creek, Ala 



Mrs. W. B; Larkin, iArkinsville, Ala" 



John T. Richards, Pi&gah, Ala 



J. M. Melver, Scotteboro, Ala 
S. S. Puryear. Hollywood, Ala 
L. E. Smith. Trenton. Ala 



£ 

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3 



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1 3 



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AKRICAN BAPTIST PUBLICATION SOCBTTC 

SUNDAY SCHOOL PERIODICALS. 




per quarter; 26 cents per year. 
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24 

10 

9 

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Chb Price* of Are or more copies to 

BAPTIST SUPERINTENDENT 6* cents 

BAPTIST TBAOHBB 12J 

IHTEBXATIONAL SEBIES. 

SENIOR QUARTERLY 6 " 

ADVANCED QUARTERLY. *. 2J " 

INTERMEDIATE QUARTERLY.... 2| 

PRIMARY QUARTERLY .." 2i 

PICTURE LESSONS 3 

BIBLE LESSONS 1* 

MDUCTITE SEBIES. 

SENIOR INDUCTIVE STUDIES.... 6 

JUNIOR INDUCTIVE STUDIES. ... 2& 
NEW PRIMARY QUABTEBLT. 

TWO YEARS WITH JESUS 2i 

ILLUSTRATED PAPEBS. 

THE WORKER lj 

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE 10 

REAPER; Monthly 2J 

REAPER, Semi-monthly 5 

SUNLIGHT, Monthly 2 

SUNLIGHT, Semi-monthly 4 

OUR LITTLE ONES (£ 



NOTICE THREE THINGS. 

ThJ'wi? *T 6 ° f * <h6 Su * LI ^ T -i cente > monthly; 16 cents, semi-monthly. 
This .s the cheapest paper published. For a competing paper, no larger or 
better, 16 cents is asked for the monthly, and 24 cents for the semi- monSK 

•2. TWO SERIES FOR 1894. 

-J^' m V th *; he,P8 / n * he » TEI WATIONAL SERIES-six helps, six 
grades-will be dropped out They will be bkttkr than kter bmobb 

Some prefer the Inductive plan of study. The Society will therefore .rive 
a choice, by publishing two new quarlerlies-Jtmioa Ibductivb Studies and 
Ssniob Indttctitk Stto», taking up a chronological life of Chrisf 

S. PRIMARY CLASSES. 

pj^n* beginnin « of ^' the Society will publish two quarterlies-the 
Primary Quarterly on the International Lessons by Mrs. M. G Kennedv ' 
and a new quarterly, Two Years with Jesus, by Miss Juliet E.' Dimock. ' 



OP CHURCHES VOW USE THE 




(JVW i*T ^Hn gsl 



WHY? Because of its merits. 

The Best Hymn Book for Baptist Churches. 
230,000 Copies Sold. 

It is used by hundreds of churches, schools, theological seminaries, and in 
the homes in all sections of the United States and Canada. 



Its Editors 



f W. Howard Doane, Mas. Dot, 
\8.E 



Johnson, D. D. 



PRICES : 

MUSIC EDITION. WORD EDITION. 

Cloth Madias, Sl.OO. By mall, 91.13. Cloth Madias, .50. Br mall, 

Oaat «« a.30, postpaid. Goat " a.««, Postpaid. 

T'ksy, full ailt, 4.0«, T'key, foil «Ht, 3.00, « 
M padded, 4.00, «« 

not ado C ptei f ° r ex * minatioD sent to any pastor or chorister* to be returned If 



SELECT GEMS, 

lower. **** 4 ** "* 0r * h7mna * ,t COB **"»s "">»« tuoea. Its price is 

The collection of nymn* and tone* is especially adapted to the 
needs of Bapti-t churches and organizations. ' W *° ** e 

It wiH wear longer. 

The book contains 

261 HY1NS AND 250 TONES. 

113,000 copies Have Been Sold. 

Reduced Prices: 






Music, cloth, S5 eta. 
M board, 2ff eta. 
** IS eta. 



■y 



itl, 40 eta. 
SO eta. 
Id eta. 



to U^^lF^SfopM^ *** f ° r cxamiMtion ^ «y partor or chor*er, 



s*»-'1;si»~ ■